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2016. november 26., szombat

26-11-2016 11:30 ~ 3h 03m ~ 51 FAVOURiTE tracks 1986-1979



>>26-11-2016 11:30<< favtraxmix 1986-1979 3h 03m 


 
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ONE FOR THE SOUL FAVTRAX:MiX ~ 3h 03m ~ 51 FAVOURiTE tracks 1986-1979 >>Lizzy Mercier Descloux, Sting, Frank Zappa, The Honeydrippers, The Smiths, X, Pink Floyd, John Cale, Frank Zappa, Bauhaus, Lydia Lunch with 8 Eyed Spy, The Sound, Lou Reed, Durutti Column, Pink Floyd<<



1986-1979


 Globetrotting French musician whose eclectic body of work encompasses New York's no wave scene and authentic African rhythms... A musician, songwriter, poet, painter, author, and actress, Lizzy Mercier Descloux enjoyed a recording career as eclectic as her résumé would suggest, breaking boundaries as one of the pioneers of New York's no wave scene as well as fusing African rhythms with R&B and pop, anticipating the worldbeat movement before it became a music business buzzword.
Lizzy Mercier Descloux
One for the Soul 3:53
Fog Horn Blues 4:15
My Funny Valentine 3:57
from One for the Soul 1986
After her deep dive into South African music on the 1984 album Zulu Rock, Lizzy Mercier Descloux had hoped to follow in a similar vein with an album recorded in New Orleans featuring both the Soweto crew she had worked with on Zulu Rock and local Cajun and zydeco musicians. However, securing visas for the South Africans proved impossible, and Mercier Descloux and producer Adam Kidron instead traveled to Brazil, where they recorded One for the Soul in Rio de Janeiro. While there's a breezy cool to Mercier Descloux's vocals and she seems to enjoy riding the percussive grooves of tunes...


 Lead singer and bassist for the Police who pursued a solo career distinguished by his sophisticated blend of jazz, pop, and world music... After disbanding the Police at the peak of their popularity in 1984, Sting quickly established himself as a viable solo artist, one obsessed with expanding the boundaries of pop music. Sting incorporated heavy elements of jazz, classical, and worldbeat into his music, writing lyrics that were literate and self-consciously meaningful, and he was never afraid to emphasize this fact in the press.
Sting
If You Love Somebody Set Them Free (Sting) 4:16 
Love Is the Seventh Wave (Sting) 3:32
Russians (Sergey Prokofiev / Sting) 3:58
The Dream of the Blue Turtles (Sting) 1:17
from The Dream Of The Blue Turtles 1985
The Police never really broke up, they just stopped working together -- largely because they just couldn't stand playing together anymore and partially because Sting was itching to establish himself as a serious musician/songwriter on his own terms. Anxious to shed the mantle of pop star, he camped out at Eddy Grant's studio, picked up the guitar, and raided Wynton Marsalis' band for his new combo -- thereby instantly consigning his solo debut, The Dream of the Blue Turtles, to the critical shorthand of Sting's jazz record. Which is partially true (that's probably the best name for the meandering instrumental title track), but that gives the impression that this is really risky music, when he did, after all, rely on musicians who, at that stage, were revivalists just developing their own style, and then had them jam on mock-jazz grooves -- or, in the case of Branford Marsalis, layer soprano sax lines on top of pop songs. This, however, is just the beginning of the pretensions layered throughout The Dream of the Blue Turtles...


 The creator of radical rock during the '60s who later pursued even more adventurous avenues, ranging from jazz-rock to classical composition... Composer, guitarist, singer, and bandleader Frank Zappa was a singular musical figure during a performing and recording career that lasted from the 1960s to the '90s. His disparate influences included doo wop music and avant-garde classical music; although he led groups that could be called rock & roll bands for much of his career, he used them to create a hybrid style that bordered on jazz and complicated, modern serious music, sometimes inducing orchestras to play along. As if his music were not challenging enough, he overlay it with highly satirical and sometimes abstractly humorous lyrics and song titles that marked him as coming out of a provocative literary tradition that included Beat poets like Allen Ginsberg and edgy comedians like Lenny Bruce. Nominally, he was a popular musician, but his recordings rarely earned significant airplay or sales, yet he was able to gain control of his recorded work and issue it successfully through his own labels while also touring internationally, in part because of the respect he earned from a dedicated cult of fans and many serious musicians, and also because he was an articulate spokesman who promoted himself into a media star through extensive interviews he considered to be a part of his creative effort just like his music.
Frank Zappa
I Don't Even Care (Johnny "Guitar" Watson / Frank Zappa) 4:40 
Little Beige Sambo (Frank Zappa) 3:02 
We're Turning Again (Frank Zappa) 4:55
from Frank Zappa Meets The Mothers Of Prevention 1985
Frank Zappa Meets the Mothers of Prevention is a transitional album that sees Zappa turning away from rock and putting more time into his Synclavier compositions...


 Briefly active in the mid-'80s, vintage R&B-inspired supergroup featuring Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, and Jeff Beck... The Honeydrippers were a post-Led Zeppelin side project for singer Robert Plant, allowing him to indulge his sincere love for vintage R&B. Though best known for the all-star aggregate that waxed the group's only recording in 1984, Plant actually formed the Honeydrippers in 1981 as a way to return to his pre-Zeppelin roots in American blues and R&B; the group took its name from blues pianist Roosevelt Sykes' nickname. The original lineup featured guitarists Robbie Blunt and Andy Sylvester, saxophonist Keith Evans, saxophonist/harmonica player Ricky Cool, bassist Jim Wickman, and drummer Kevin O'Neil.
The Honeydrippers
I Get a Thrill (Rudy Toombs) 2:40 
Sea of Love (George Khoury) 3:05 
I Got a Woman (Ray Charles) 3:00
from The Honeydrippers Volume One 1984
A telling thing about Robert Plant at his peak is how he would sneak on-stage with Rockpile and sing Elvis songs, or how Swan Song signed Dave Edmunds when his retro-rock was about the furthest thing from the monolithic Zeppelin of Physical Graffiti. Plant always harbored deep, abiding love for early rock & roll, a fact that was often obscured by his restlessness, too, a side that he indulged on his first two post-Zep solo albums -- glistening, modern albums with a heavier debt to Robert Fripp than Little Richard. Two albums in, he switched tactics for the EP detour The Honeydrippers, Vol. 1, an unabashedly retro-rock project that hauled out five golden oldies from the pre-Beatles era and served them up authentically, or at least as authentic nostalgia...


 One of the great bands of the '80s, driven equally by Johnny Marr's dexterous guitar riffs and Morrissey's fiercely witty wordplay... The Smiths were the definitive British indie rock band of the '80s, marking the end of synth-driven new wave and the beginning of the guitar rock that dominated English rock into the '90s. Sonically, the group was indebted to the British Invasion, crafting ringing, melodic three-minute pop singles, even for their album tracks. But their scope was far broader than that of a revivalist band. The group's core members, vocalist Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr, were obsessive rock fans inspired by the D.I.Y. ethics of punk, but they also had a fondness for girl groups, pop, and rockabilly.
The Smiths
Reel Around the Fountain (Johnny Marr / Morrissey) 5:59 
Miserable Lie (Johnny Marr / Morrissey) 4:27 
The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (Johnny Marr / Morrissey) 4:38 
from The Smiths 1984
Arriving in an era dominated by synth pop and gloomy post-punk, the Smiths' eponymous debut was the bracing beginning of a new era. On the surface, the Smiths' sound wasn't radically different from traditional British guitar pop -- Johnny Marr's ringing, layered guitars were catchy and melodic -- but it was actually an astonishing subversion of the form, turning the structure inside out. Very few of the songs followed conventional verse-chorus structure, yet they were quite melodic within their own right. Marr's inventive songwriting was made all the more original and innovative by Morrissey's crooning and lyrics...


 Influential L.A. punk band known for an exhilarating blend of punk, rockabilly, and blues, with a sound and style that outlived the movement... X were far from the first punk rock band in Los Angeles, and they weren't the first to achieve some level of nationwide recognition, but in a very real way, they were the ones who put the L.A. punk scene on the map. X were the first L.A. punk band to be taken seriously by the rock press on both coasts, and at a time when many wondered how punk could thrive in the land of all that was mellow, X played music that was as raw, passionate, and powerful as anything coming out of New York, London, or any other major city.
X
The New World (Exene Cervenka / John Doe) 3:25 
True Love, Pt. 1 (Exene Cervenka / John Doe) 2:15
True Love, Pt. 2 (Exene Cervenka / John Doe) 5:02 
from More Fun In The New World 1983
Coming off their 1982 masterpiece Under the Big Black Sun, X offered their follow-up More Fun in the New World one year later. While its predecessor won the band a slew of new fans, it didn't serve as the major breakthrough that it so deservedly should have. Rightfully, they didn't fool with their already winning formula; they issued another solid set of songs produced, again, by Ray Manzarek...



 One of the most predominant and celebrated rock bands of all time, prog- and space-rock legends, known for superlative musicianship...  Some bands turn into shorthand for a certain sound or style, and Pink Floyd belongs among that elite group. The very name connotes something specific: an elastic, echoing, mind-bending sound that evokes the chasms of space. Pink Floyd grounded that limitless sound with exacting explorations of mundane matters of ego, mind, memory, and heart, touching upon madness, alienation, narcissism, and society on their concept albums of the '70s.
Pink Floyd
The Post War Dream (Roger Waters) 2:59 
Your Possible Pasts (Roger Waters) 4:36
One of the Few (Roger Waters) 1:17
When the Tigers Broke Free (Roger Waters) 3:12 
from The Final Cut 1983
The Final Cut extends the autobiography of The Wall, concentrating on Roger Waters' pain when his father died in World War II. Waters spins this off into a treatise on the futility of war, concentrating on the Falkland Islands, setting his blistering condemnations and scathing anger to impossibly subdued music that demands full attention. This is more like a novel than a record, requiring total concentration since shifts in dynamics, orchestration, and instrumentation are used as effect. This means that while this has the texture of classic Pink Floyd, somewhere between the brooding sections of The Wall and the monolithic menace of Animals, there are no songs or hooks to make these radio favorites. The even bent of the arrangements, where the music is used as texture, not music, means that The Final Cut purposely alienates all but the dedicated listener...



 Founding member of the Velvet Underground, then a producer, collaborator, solo artist, and soundtrack composer... While John Cale is one of the most famous and, in his own way, influential underground rock musicians, he is also one of the hardest to pin down stylistically. Much has been made of his schooling in classical and avant-garde music, yet much of what he's recorded has been decidedly song-oriented, dovetailing close to the mainstream at times.
John Cale
Taking Your Life in Your Hands (John Cale) 4:45 
Sanities (John Cale) 6:06
(I Keep A) Close Watch (John Cale) 3:07
from Music For a New Society 1982
The aural chaos and intense paranoia of John Cale's "comeback" albums Sabotage/Live and Honi Soit seemingly left him with very few places left to go, short of setting back-issues of Soldier of Fortune to music. 1982's Music for a New Society was, from a musical standpoint, a remarkable about-face, sounding calm, spare, and spectral where his last few albums had been all rant and rage; the arrangements were dominated by Cale's open, languid keyboard patterns, and there was far more aural "white space" in their framings than he had permitted himself since The Academy in Peril. But beyond the cool, reserved exteriors of Music for a New Society, one finds a handful of stories of terribly damaged lives...
Guitarist Lutz Ulosch, Nico, and John Cale backstage at CBGB after their performance
 The creator of radical rock during the '60s who later pursued even more adventurous avenues, ranging from jazz-rock to classical composition... Composer, guitarist, singer, and bandleader Frank Zappa was a singular musical figure during a performing and recording career that lasted from the 1960s to the '90s. His disparate influences included doo wop music and avant-garde classical music; although he led groups that could be called rock & roll bands for much of his career, he used them to create a hybrid style that bordered on jazz and complicated, modern serious music, sometimes inducing orchestras to play along. As if his music were not challenging enough, he overlay it with highly satirical and sometimes abstractly humorous lyrics and song titles that marked him as coming out of a provocative literary tradition that included Beat poets like Allen Ginsberg and edgy comedians like Lenny Bruce.
Frank Zappa
No, Not Now (Frank Zappa) 5:51
Valley Girl (Frank Zappa) 4:50
I Come from Nowhere (Frank Zappa) 6:09
Envelopes (Frank Zappa) 2:45
from Ship Arriving Too Late To Save A Drowning Witch 1982
Released in May 1982, Ship Arriving Too Late to Save a Drowning Witch marks Frank Zappa's entrance into the 1980s. From this point on, his rock records would focus on single, simple rock songs (the previous year's You Are What You Is had them organized in interconnecting suites) with occasionally more complex instrumental numbers. The recipe would be extended to The Man From Utopia (1983) and Them or Us (1984)...

 Founding fathers of goth rock, driven by moody post-punk dynamics and jagged guitar chords, plus the manic mysticism of singer Peter Murphy... Bauhaus are the founding fathers of goth rock, creating a minimalistic, overbearingly gloomy style of post-punk rock driven by jagged guitar chords and cold, distant synthesizers. Throughout their brief career, the band explored all the variations on their bleak musical ideas, adding elements of glam rock, experimental electronic rock, funk, and heavy metal.
Bauhaus
Hair of the Dog (Daniel Ash / Kevin Haskins / David J / Peter Murphy) 2:42 
Passion of Lovers 3:52
Of Lillies and Remains (Daniel Ash / Kevin Haskins / David J / Peter Murphy) 3:18 
from Mask 1981
Managing the sometimes hard-to-negotiate trick of expanding their sound while retaining all the qualities which got them attention to begin with, on Mask the members of Bauhaus consciously stretched themselves into newer areas of music and performance, resulting in an album that was arguably even better than the band's almost flawless debut. More familiar sides of the band were apparent from the get-go; opening number "Hair of the Dog," one of the band's best songs, starts with a double-tracked squalling guitar solo before turning into a stomping, surging flow, carefully paced by sudden silences and equally sudden returns to the music...


 A pivotal figure in the late-'70s no wave scene, a punk poet/actor who recorded confrontational, sexually charged music... After leaving the seminal New York no wave outfit Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, poet/actress/vocalist Lydia Lunch (b. Lydia Koch) embarked on a solo career marked by frequent collaborations and band changes, plus an attitude of confrontational nihilism expressed in both her sound and her often violent and/or sexually oriented subject matter.
Lydia Lunch with 8 Eyed Spy
Diddy Wah Diddy 2:19
Love Split 2:10
Swamp 0:57
Motor Oil Shanty (Lydia Lunch) 4:29
from 8-eyed Spy 1981
Another chunk of Atavistic's long-overdue retrospective of Lydia Lunch's highly influential early work, 8 Eyed Spy collects the entire recorded output of Lunch's second band. A far more overtly "musical" group than Teenage Jesus & the Jerks (which also featured Lunch and Jim Sclavunos, who switched from bass to drums for the new band), 8 Eyed Spy were no less confrontational. A modicum of actual talent and a newfound appreciation for musical forms that predate 1977 inform 8 Eyed Spy's slightly less chaotic music, making this compilation sort of the downtown post-punk equivalent to Trout Mask Replica...


The Sound's inability to break through to the type of '80s post-punk prominence reserved for the likes of Joy Division and Echo & the Bunnymen, the two bands the Sound fell in between sound-wise, isn't all that easy to explain away...
The Sound
I Can't Escape Myself  3:55
Hour of Need 3:03
Jeopardy 3:38
from Jeopardy 1980
Despite the production's rough edges, the limited budget that fostered it, and the feeling that it sounds more like several A-sides and a couple decent B-sides thrown together than a singular body, Jeopardy is a caustic jolt of a debut that startles and fascinates. With the plaintive intro of the rhythm section, a spidery guitar, and incidental synth wobbles (which all sounds surprisingly Neu!-like), "I Can't Escape Myself" begins the album unassumingly enough until reaching the terse, one-line chorus that echoes the title of the song; suddenly, from out of the blue, all the instruments make a quick, violent, collective stab and retreat back into the following verse as singer Adrian Borland catches his breath...


 One of rock's most important singer/songwriters, the creator of a daring body of work who proved rock & roll could be art... The career of Lou Reed defied capsule summarization. Like David Bowie (whom Reed directly inspired in many ways), he made over his image many times, mutating from theatrical glam rocker to strung-out junkie to avant-garde noiseman to straight rock & roller to your average guy. Few would deny Reed's immense importance and considerable achievements. As has often been written, he expanded the vocabulary of rock & roll lyrics into the previously forbidden territory of kinky sex, drug use (and abuse), decadence, transvestites, homosexuality, and suicidal depression. As has been pointed out less often, he remained committed to using rock & roll as a forum for literary, mature expression throughout his artistic life, without growing lyrically soft or musically complacent.
Lou Reed
How Do You Speak to an Angel? (Michael Fonfara / Lou Reed) 4:08 
My Old Man (Michael Fonfara / Lou Reed) 3:13
Keep Away (Michael Fonfara / Lou Reed) 3:33
Growing up in Public (Michael Fonfara / Lou Reed) 3:02 
from Growing Up In Public 1980
Growing Up in Public was a transitional album for Lou Reed; it was his last set with his long-running road band (dominated by keyboardist Michael Fonfara), and while the fleshed-out arrangements are of a piece with Reed's work on Rock & Roll Heart and The Bells, the lyrics of the best songs anticipate the directly personal, emotionally naked songwriting that marked the two extraordinary albums that would follow, The Blue Mask and Legendary Hearts...


 One of the earliest and most enduring acts springing from the Factory Records scene... The Durutti Column was primarily the vehicle of Vini Reilly, a guitarist born in Manchester, England, in 1953. As a child, Reilly first took up the piano, drawing inspiration from greats like Art Tatum and Fats Waller, before learning to play guitar at the age of ten. Despite an early affection for folk and jazz, Reilly ultimately became swept up by the punk movement, and in 1977 he joined the group Ed Banger & the Nosebleeds. In 1978, Factory Records founder Tony Wilson invited Reilly to join a group dubbed the Durutti Column, the name inspired by the Spanish Civil War anarchist Buenaventura Durruti and a Situationists Internationale comic strip of the 1960s.
Durutti Column
Sketch for Summer (Vini Reilly)  2:57
Sketch for Winter (Vini Reilly) 2:24
First Aspect of the Same Thing (Martin Hannett) 3:43
Second Aspect of the Same Thing (Martin Hannett) 2:59 
from Return Of the Durutti Column 1979
More debut albums should be so amusingly perverse with its titles -- and there's the original vinyl sleeve, which consisted of sandpaper precisely so it would damage everything next to it in one's collection. Released in the glow of post-punk fervor in late-'70s Manchester, one would think Return would consist of loud, aggressive sheet-metal feedback, but that's not the way Vini Reilly works. With heavy involvement from producer Martin Hannett, who created all the synth pieces on the record as well as producing it, Reilly on Return made a quietly stunning debut, as influential down the road as his labelmates in Joy Division's effort with Unknown Pleasures. Eschewing formal "rock" composition and delivery -- the album was entirely instrumental, favoring delicacy and understated invention instead of singalong brashness -- Reilly made his mark as the most unique, distinct guitarist from Britain since Bert Jansch...
The Durutti Column performing live, early '80s
 One of the most predominant and celebrated rock bands of all time, prog- and space-rock legends, known for superlative musicianship... Some bands turn into shorthand for a certain sound or style, and Pink Floyd belongs among that elite group. The very name connotes something specific: an elastic, echoing, mind-bending sound that evokes the chasms of space. Pink Floyd grounded that limitless sound with exacting explorations of mundane matters of ego, mind, memory, and heart, touching upon madness, alienation, narcissism, and society on their concept albums of the '70s.
Pink Floyd
In the Flesh? (Roger Waters) 3:18
The Thin Ice (Roger Waters) 2:26
Another Brick in the Wall, Pt. 1 (Roger Waters) 3:12
The Happiest Days of Our Lives (Roger Waters) 1:50
Another Brick in the Wall, Pt. 2 (Roger Waters) 3:58  
from The Wall 1979
The Wall was Roger Waters' crowning accomplishment in Pink Floyd. It documented the rise and fall of a rock star (named Pink Floyd), based on Waters' own experiences and the tendencies he'd observed in people around him. By then, the bassist had firm control of the group's direction, working mostly alongside David Gilmour and bringing in producer Bob Ezrin as an outside collaborator. Drummer Nick Mason was barely involved, while keyboardist Rick Wright seemed to be completely out of the picture. Still, The Wall was a mighty, sprawling affair, featuring 26 songs with vocals: nearly as many as all previous Floyd albums combined...




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