mixtapes for weathers and moods / music for good days and bad days


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2017. március 2., csütörtök

02-03-2017 17:56 # 41 jazz tracks on the JAZZ_line 1962-1972 / 4h 53m

02-03-2017 17:56 # Herbie Hancock, Andrzej Kurylewicz Quintet, Miles Davis, Jimmy McGriff, Charles Lloyd, Wayne Shorter, Lonnie Smith, Keith Jarrett Trio, Miles Davis, John McLaughlin, McCoy Tyner, Kenny Burrell, Gabor Szabo, Annette Peacock, Oregon # 4h 53m


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1962-1972





Inventive, intelligent, and talented pianist/keyboardist whose distinguished career has covered modern jazz, fusion, hip-hop, and dance... Herbie Hancock will always be one of the most revered and controversial figures in jazz -- just as his employer/mentor Miles Davis was when he was alive. Unlike Miles, who pressed ahead relentlessly and never looked back until near the very end, Hancock has cut a zigzagging forward path, shuttling between almost every development in electronic and acoustic jazz and R&B over the last third of the 20th century and into the 21st. Though grounded in Bill Evans and able to absorb blues, funk, gospel, and even modern classical influences, Hancock's piano and keyboard voices are entirely his own, with their own urbane harmonic and complex, earthy rhythmic signatures -- and young pianists cop his licks constantly...
Driftin' (Herbie Hancock) 6:57
Watermelon Man (Herbie Hancock) 7:09
Empty Pockets (Herbie Hancock) 6:12
from Takin' Off 1962
Herbie Hancock's debut as a leader, Takin' Off, revealed a composer and pianist able to balance sophistication and accessibility, somewhat in the vein of Blue Note's prototype hard bopper Horace Silver. Yet while Hancock could be just as funky and blues-rooted as Silver, their overall styles diverged in several ways: Hancock was lighter and more cerebral, a bit more adventurous in his harmonies, and more apt to break his solos out of a groove (instead of using them to create one). So even if, in retrospect, Takin' Off is among Hancock's most conventional albums, it shows a young stylist already strikingly mature for his age, and one who can interpret established forms with spirit and imagination...




Andrzej Kurylewicz (born 24 November 1932 in Lwów, died 12 April 2007 in Konstancin-Jeziorna), was a Polish composer, pianist, trombonist, trumpet player and conductor. His works range from serious music, including both chamber and symphonic pieces, to theatrical, film, ballet, and jazz. He was shaped in the tradition of classical and serious music and pioneered Polish jazz, cultivating both areas in parallel.
Andrzej Kurylewicz Quintet
Go Right (Karola) 5:01
Green Eyed Girl (Wróblewski) 3:58
Nyamaland (Kurylewicz) 5:26
from Go Right  1963
Trumpet – Andrzej Kurylewicz
Piano – Wojciech Karolak
Tenor Saxophone, Flute – Jan Ptaszyn Wróblewski
Bass – Tadeusz Wójcik
Drums – Andrzej Dąbrowski


The epitome of cool, an eternally evolving trumpeter who repeatedly changed the course of jazz between the 1950s and '90s. 
Miles Davis
Milestones (Miles Davis) 8:58
So What (Miles Davis) 10:27
from Miles in Berlin  Rec.: 1964 (1965)
Recorded live in Germany at the Berlin Philharmonic, Miles in Berlin represents the first recording of trumpeter Miles Davis with tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter. For various reasons, saxophonists George Coleman and Sam Rivers had both come and gone as members of Davis' band. With the addition of Shorter in 1964, Davis had found the lineup of musicians that he would stick with until 1968 and produce some of the most influential albums of his career -- collected on The Miles Davis Quintet, 1965-68: The Complete Columbia Studio. Eventually known as the "second great quintet," most of the players here, including pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams, had been with Davis for just under a year. In that time, they had taken his traditional repertoire of standards and originals and reworked them with a more adventurous, edgy approach that flirted with the avant-garde. While there isn't a huge difference in the sound of this band or choice of songs from the group that recorded Seven Steps to Heaven or Miles Davis in Europe, there is a palpable sense of creative abandon in Davis' performance as well as synergy to the group sound that seems to foreshadow the innovative music to come.



Another successful practitioner of the funky-blues and soul-jazz sound to which the Hammond B-3 is so suited  / One of the all-time giants of the Hammond B-3, Jimmy McGriff sometimes gets lost amid all the great soul-jazz organists from his hometown of Philadelphia. He was almost certainly the bluesiest of the major soul-jazz pioneers, and indeed, he often insisted that he was more of a blues musician than a jazz artist; nonetheless, he remained eclectic enough to blur the lines of classification. His sound -- deep, down-to-earth grooves drenched in blues and gospel feeling -- made him quite popular with R&B audiences, even more so than some of his peers; what was more, he was able to condense those charms into concise, funky, jukebox-ready singles that often did surprisingly well on the R&B charts...
Discotheque U.S.A. (Jimmy McGriff) 3:24
Blues for Joe (Jimmy McGriff) 3:00
The Dog (You Dog) (Jimmy McGriff) 3:26
Blues for Mr. Jimmy was the last album Hammond B-3 ace Jimmy McGriff recorded for Sue Records before moving on to Solid State Records in 1965, and in some ways it is the archetypal McGriff record. Working in a trio format with drummer Jimmie Smith and guitarist Larry Frazier, McGriff is in fine form, bringing his patented blues- and gospel-inflected soul jazz to the edge of funk...


Saxophone player who cross-pollinated jazz with rock as well as non-Western styles to aid the development of fusion and world music. 
Forest Flower-Sunrise (Charles Lloyd) 7:30
Sorcery (Keith Jarrett) 5:19
When Charles Lloyd brought his new band to Monterey in 1966, a band that included Keith Jarrett on piano, Jack DeJohnette on drums, and the inimitable -- though young -- Cecil McBee on bass, no one knew what to expect. But they all left floored and this LP is the document of that set. It is difficult to believe that, with players so young (and having been together under a year), Lloyd was able to muster a progressive jazz that was so far-reaching and so undeniably sophisticated, yet so rich and accessible...


A major sax innovator for hard boppers and fusionists alike, due to his influential tenures with Art Blakey, Miles Davis, and Weather Report.
Tom Thumb (Wayne Shorter) 6:15
Schizophrenia (Wayne Shorter) 6:50
from Schizophrenia 1967
Wayne Shorter was at the peak of his creative powers when he recorded Schizophrenia in the spring of 1967. Assembling a sextet that featured two of his Miles Davis bandmates (pianist Herbie Hancock and bassist Ron Carter), trombonist Curtis Fuller, alto saxophonist/flautist James Spaulding and drummer Joe Chambers, Shorter found a band that was capable of conveying his musical "schizophrenia," which means that this is a band that can play straight just as well as they can stretch the limits of jazz...


Virtuosic funk-jazz organist whose teaching career limited his recording output.  / Organist Lonnie Smith has often been confused with keyboardist/pianist Lonnie Liston Smith -- and, in fact, more than a few retailers have wrongly assumed that they're one and the same. In the mid-'60s, the Hammond hero earned recognition for his membership in George Benson's classic quartet before going on to play with Lou Donaldson (contributing some memorable solos to the alto saxman's hit 1967 album Alligator Bogaloo) and recording enjoyable dates of his own for Blue Note...
Son of Ice Bag (Hugh Masekela) 11:12
Think (Aretha Franklin / A.J. Franklyn / Theodore Richard White) 4:43
Slouchin' (Dr. Lonnie Smith) 6:52
from Think! 1968
Think!, organist Lonnie Smith's 1968 sophomore effort for Blue Note, is easily one of the strongest dates the Hammond B-3 master would produce for the label. Featuring a stellar group of musicians including trumpeter Lee Morgan, tenor saxophonist David Newman, guitarist Melvin Sparks, and drummer Marion Booker, Jr., as well as a three-member Afro-Latin percussion unit led by Henry "Pucho" Brown, Think! is a perfect mix of funky soul and forward-thinking jazz. Kicking things off with Hugh Masekela's instantly memorable "Son of Ice Bag," both Sparks and Newman take searching funk-flow solos while Morgan seems to be remembering a certain Masekela lick he dug...


Keyboard player who became one of the most extraordinary solo improvisers in jazz, with considerable mainstream success and a wide range of styles. 
Keith Jarrett Trio
My Back Pages (Bob Dylan) 5:24
Moving Soon (Keith Jarrett) 4:24
New Rag (Keith Jarrett) 5:40
from Somewhere Before 1969
While still a member of the Charles Lloyd Quartet, Keith Jarrett did some occasional moonlighting with a trio, anchored by two future members of Jarrett's classic quartet, Charlie Haden (bass) and Paul Motian (drums). On this CD, Jarrett turns in a very eclectic set at Shelly's Manne-Hole in Hollywood, careening through a variety of idioms where his emerging individuality comes through in flashes...


The epitome of cool, an eternally evolving trumpeter who repeatedly changed the course of jazz between the 1950s and '90s. 
Miles Davis
Mademoiselle Mabry (Miss Mabry) (Miles Davis) 16:33
Two Faced (Wayne Shorter) 18:03
Splash: Interlude 1/Interlude 2/Interlude 3 (Miles Davis) 10:05
from The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions Rec. 1968-1969 (2001)
Of all the recording sessions completed by Miles Davis with his various bands, the sessions surrounding In a Silent Way Sessions in 1968 and 1969 are easily the most mysterious and enigmatic. For starters, they signified the completion of his transformation from acoustic to electric sound, and secondly, they marked the complete dissolution of the "second" quintet of Davis, Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Wayne Shorter, and Ron Carter that had begun on Filles de Kilimanjaro. The addition of Chick Corea as a second keyboard player and the replacement of Ron Carter with Dave Holland had changed the sound of the band's dynamic, textural, and rhythmic palettes. The final break with Davis' own previous musical sound happened when he added guitarist John McLaughlin and keyboardist/composer Joe Zawinul (for a temporary three-keyboard sound)...



Influential jazz guitarist who also explored blues, flamenco, and Indian music, and helped found the jazz/rock fusion movement. 
John McLaughlin
Devotion (John McLaughlin) 11:26
Marbles (John McLaughlin) 4:11
Siren (John McLaughlin) 5:44
from Devotion 1970
This album is from a pivotal moment in McLaughlin's history. This was just after he left Miles' group, but before Mahavishnu Orchestra started, and the music captures this moment perfectly. McLaughlin's technique had not progressed to "Mahavishnu" perfection yet, but the music has the in-your-face rock drive of the Mahavishnu Orchestra. This recording date grew out of sessions Alan Douglas put together, featuring McLaughlin and Larry Young jamming with Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Miles (Billy Rich was the bass player). McLaughlin sounded timid next to Hendrix (none of the material with Hendrix has been officially released), but really comes to life on Devotion. This is arguably one of the finest acid rock albums of all time. McLaughlin is on fire, using fuzzboxes and phasers, over Larry Young's swirling Hammond B-3, with Billy Rich and Buddy Miles as the rock-solid rhythm section. If you think that McLaughlin's solo at the end of "Right Off" (from A Tribute to Jack Johnson) is one of the high points of his career, then this is the album for you...

Jazz pianist whose inventive two-handed forays, extensive modal solos, and dashing phrases made him arguably the best pianist to debut in the '60s. 
McCoy Tyner
Message from the Nile (McCoy Tyner) 12:22
Survival Blues (McCoy Tyner) 13:16
from Extensions 1970
This stimulating LP has an interesting combination of players. It may be the only recording to include both pianist McCoy Tyner and his successor with the John Coltrane Quartet, Alice Coltrane (who adds atmosphere with her harp). The set also matches the young altoist Gary Bartz with Wayne Shorter (doubling on tenor and soprano), whom he succeeded in Miles Davis' group, and reunites Shorter and bassist Ron Carter, and Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones. The all-star sextet stretches out on lengthy renditions of four of Tyner's modal originals, and there is strong solo space for the leader and the two saxophonists. Wayne Shorter in particular is often quite intense.


The epitome of good taste and solid swing, there's no finer exponent of smoky guitar jazz. / One of the leading exponents of straight-ahead jazz guitar, Kenny Burrell is a highly influential artist whose understated and melodic style, grounded in bebop and blues, made him in an in-demand sideman from the mid-'50s onward and a standard by which many jazz guitarists gauge themselves to this day.
Be Yourself 5:54
Do What You Gotta Do 9:33
God Bless the Child 8:52
Kenny Burrell's guitaristry is well-documented in his years with Oscar Peterson and on his first dates as a leader on the Blue Note label, but God Bless the Child, his only date for CTI in 1971, is an under-heard masterpiece in his catalog. Burrell's band for the set includes bassist Ron Carter, percussionist Ray Barretto, Richard Wyands on piano, flutist Hubert Laws, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, and drummer Billy Cobham. CTI's house arranger, Don Sebesky, assembled and conducted the strings in a manner that stands strangely and beautifully apart from his other work on the label. Sebesky understood Burrell's understated approach to playing guitar. Burrell didn't belong with the fusioneers, but he could groove better than any of them...


One of the most original guitarists to emerge in the 1960s, mixing his Hungarian heritage and a distinctive sound with advanced jazz settings. / Gabor Szabo was one of the most original guitarists to emerge in the 1960s, mixing his Hungarian folk music heritage with a deep love of jazz and crafting a distinctive, largely self-taught sound. Inspired by a Roy Rogers cowboy movie, Szabo began playing guitar when he was 14 and often played in dinner clubs and covert jam sessions while still living in Budapest. 
Breezin' (Bobby Womack) 3:11
Fingers (Wolfgang Melz / Gabor Szabo) 7:35
Just a Little Communication (Bobby Womack) 7:50
from High Contrast 1971
Recorded in 1970 for Blue Thumb with producer Tommy LiPuma and engineer Bruce Botnick, High Contrast, issued in 1971, represents one of the more remarkable collaborations in Gabor Szabo's career. The Hungarian guitarist enlisted Bobby Womack as both rhythm guitarist and as a composer -- he contributed four of these seven tunes. The rest of the band included drummer Jim Keltner, bassists Wolfgang Melz and Phil Upchurch, and conguero Felix "Flaco" Falcon, as well as a couple of other percussionists. Predating Bob James' One by three years, and issued in the same annum as Grover Washington, Jr.'s Inner City Blues, High Contrast is a truly wonderful early exercise in highly polished, funky jazz...


A unique force in avant-garde jazz as a singer, composer, and multi-instrumentalist.  / Annette Peacock's work as a vocalist, pianist, and composer is austere, cryptic, laconic, minimalistic, and relentlessly individual. Her dry delivery and penchant for stark, stripped-down musical "environments" have made her something of a cult figure and an icon of the avant-garde. An early participant (1961-1962) in Dr. Timothy Leary's psychedelic culture experiments and a longtime adherent of Zen Macrobiotics, Peacock has been releasing albums since 1968. But her career has been marked by fairly long periods of silence; this partly explains her relative obscurity.
I'm the One (Annette Peacock / Bob Ringe) 6:55
Pony (Annette Peacock) 6:21
Love Me Tender (Vera Matson / Elvis Presley) 3:45
from I'm The One 1972 
Annette Peacock’s 1972 album I’m the One—first released by RCA and now reissued by Light in the Attic’s Future Days imprint—is positively impressive. Peacock, one of the first people and maybe the first woman to own one of Robert Moog’s famed synthesizers—crafted an album that bridges with soul, pop, jazz, and a few other genres that still haven’t been named. Her 1968 album with then-husband Paul Bley (as the Bley-Peacock Synthesizer Show), Revenge, showcased her imagination for and acumen with the instrument. I’m the One spotlights her abilities as a vocalist, composer, and innovator in a fashion that is seamless and still—40 years after this record’s first appearance—breathtaking.


Uncompromising avant-jazz group who defy categorization  / Oregon emerged in 1970 as a splinter band from the Paul Winter Consort. Its members each had experience in jazz, classical, and a variety of non-western musical styles, and were also multi-instrumentalists. Ralph Towner played standard acoustic and 12-string guitar, piano, a variety of electric keyboards, trumpet and flügelhorn. Paul McCandless' instrumental arsenal included oboe, English horn, soprano sax, bass clarinet, the musette, and tin flute. Collin Walcott handled most of the percussion duties on tabla and various African and Latin rhythm instruments plus sitar, dulcimer, clarinet, and violin. Glen Moore was the bassist, and also played clarinet, viola, piano, and flute.
Sail (Collin Walcott) 4:33
Opening (Oregon) 5:33
The Swan (Paul McCandless) 3:53
Music of Another Present Era remains Oregon's most enduring masterwork. Achieving a perfect balance of musical traditions from the East and West, ancient to future, they set the stage not only for a new transculturalism in jazz, but also created a lasting template for the fusion of musics from world traditions that would flower over a decade later. The four participants in Oregon, oboist and pianist Paul McCandless, guitarist and pianist Ralph Towner, upright bassist and pianist Glen Moore, and the late multi-instrumentalist Collin Walcott, operated on the premise that melodic ideas and expansive harmonies all contributed to a music that didn't bridge cultures, but erased them and eradicated them. This is a place where the astute dynamics of classical music meet the freedom of post-bop jazz in an inquiry of world rhythms and harmonics...








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