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2017. április 10., hétfő

10-04-2017 12:34 # 43 jazz tracks on the the JAZZ_line 1972-1979 / 4h 35m

OREGON

10-04-2017 12:34 # 43 jazz tracks on the the JAZZ_line 1972-1979 / 4h 35m # Oregon, Michal Urbaniak, Roy Ayers Ubiquity, Sam Rivers, Richard "Groove" Holmes, Wayne Shorter feat. Milton Nascimento, Weather Report, Sonny & Linda Sharrock, Return to Forever, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Yusef Lateef, Miles Davis, Weather Report, Jean-Luc Ponty, Larry Coryell



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1972-1979




Uncompromising avant-jazz group who defy categorization  / Oregon emerged in 1970 as a splinter band from the Paul Winter Consort. Its members each had experience in jazz, classical, and a variety of non-western musical styles, and were also multi-instrumentalists. Ralph Towner played standard acoustic and 12-string guitar, piano, a variety of electric keyboards, trumpet and flügelhorn. Paul McCandless' instrumental arsenal included oboe, English horn, soprano sax, bass clarinet, the musette, and tin flute. Collin Walcott handled most of the percussion duties on tabla and various African and Latin rhythm instruments plus sitar, dulcimer, clarinet, and violin. Glen Moore was the bassist, and also played clarinet, viola, piano, and flute.
Sail (Collin Walcott) 4:33
Opening (Oregon) 5:33
The Swan (Paul McCandless) 3:53
Music of Another Present Era remains Oregon's most enduring masterwork. Achieving a perfect balance of musical traditions from the East and West, ancient to future, they set the stage not only for a new transculturalism in jazz, but also created a lasting template for the fusion of musics from world traditions that would flower over a decade later. The four participants in Oregon, oboist and pianist Paul McCandless, guitarist and pianist Ralph Towner, upright bassist and pianist Glen Moore, and the late multi-instrumentalist Collin Walcott, operated on the premise that melodic ideas and expansive harmonies all contributed to a music that didn't bridge cultures, but erased them and eradicated them. This is a place where the astute dynamics of classical music meet the freedom of post-bop jazz in an inquiry of world rhythms and harmonics...

An acclaimed Polish violinist and saxophonist. His eclectic career has covered jazz, folk and funk. / Once Poland's most promising import in the jazz-rock 1970s, Michal Urbaniak's chief value in retrospect was as a fellow traveler of Jean-Luc Ponty, a fluid advocate of the electric violin, the lower-pitched Violectra, and the Lyricon (the first popular, if now largely under-utilized wind synthesizer). Like many Eastern European jazzmen, he would incorporate elements of Polish folk music into his jazz pursuits, and his other heroes range from the inevitable Miles Davis to Polish classicist Witold Lutoslawski. His electric violin was often filtered with a gauze of electronic modifying devices, and on occasion, he could come up with an attractively memorable composition like "Satin Lady."
Michal Urbaniak
Bengal (Michal Urbaniak)17:41
Lato (Michal Urbaniak) 8:01
from Constellation In Concert 1973



A gifted jazz vibraphonist and vocalist who successfully bridged jazz, funk, and disco in the mid 1970s and early '80s.  / Once one of the most visible and winning jazz vibraphonists of the 1960s, then an R&B bandleader in the 1970s and '80s, Roy Ayers' reputation s now that of one of the prophets of acid jazz, a man decades ahead of his time.
Roy Ayers Ubiquity
Brother Louie (Errol Brown / Anthony Wilson) 6:08
I Am Your Mind (Roy Ayers / Carl Clay) 6:13
Giving Love (Leroy Hutson / Joe D. Reaves / Joe Reaves) 4:26
from Virgo Red 1973
Despite contributions from an abundance of soul-jazz greats including Dee Dee Bridgewater, Jimmy Owens, and Garnett Brown, Virgo Red is the most stripped-down and nuanced of Roy Ayers' Ubiquity LPs. Its sinuous funk grooves are first and foremost a showcase for the intuitive interplay of Ayers and electric keyboardist Harry Whitaker, whose Fender Rhodes' fills orbit Ayers' vibes' solos like a planet circling the sun...




One of the great, and most underrated, figures in the jazz avant-garde, composer, and reedman Sam Rivers turned out rigorous, substantive work from the early '60s well into the 2000s. 
Sam Rivers
Exultation (Sam Rivers) 8:26
Orb (Sam Rivers) 9:37
from Crystals 1974
When Sam Rivers' Crystals was released in 1974, it had been over a decade since Ornette had worked with his Free Jazz Double Quartet, nine years since Coltrane assembled his Ascension band, and six since the first Jazz Composers' Orchestra Association was formed and whose first records were issued (a couple of members of that band also perform with Rivers here). It's difficult to note in the 21st century just how forward-thinking this avant-garde big band was, and how completely innovative Rivers' compositions are...



Great jazz organist who developed a strong, swinging style with powerful basslines and a superb harmonic and melodic edge.  / Revered in soul-jazz circles, Richard "Groove" Holmes was an unapologetically swinging Jimmy Smith admirer who could effortlessly move from the grittiest of blues to the most sentimental of ballads. Holmes, a very accessible, straightforward and warm player who was especially popular in the black community, had been well respected on the Philadelphia/Southern New Jersey circuit by the time he signed with Pacific Jazz in the early '60s and started receiving national attention by recording with such greats as Ben Webster and Gene Ammons..
Richard "Groove" Holmes
Groovin' for Mr. G. (Richard "Groove" Holmes) 4:13
Mr. Clean (Weldon Irvine) 5:04
Don't Mess With Me (Richard "Groove" Holmes) 6:47
from Comin' On Home 1974



A major sax innovator for hard boppers and fusionists alike, due to his influential tenures with Art Blakey, Miles Davis, and Weather Report. / Though some will argue about whether Wayne Shorter's primary impact on jazz has been as a composer or as a saxophonist, hardly anyone will dispute his overall importance as one of jazz's leading figures over a long span of time. Though indebted to a great extent to John Coltrane, with whom he practiced in the mid-'50s while still an undergraduate, Shorter eventually developed his own more succinct manner on tenor sax, retaining the tough tone quality and intensity and, in later years, adding an element of funk. On soprano, Shorter is almost another player entirely, his lovely tone shining like a light beam, his sensibilities attuned more to lyrical thoughts, his choice of notes becoming more spare as his career unfolded...
Milton Nascimento
Wayne Shorter feat. Milton Nascimento
Brazilian singer-songwriter who draws inspiration from his homeland’s Portuguese heritage. / International singing superstar and songwriter Milton Nascimento may have his roots in Brazil, but his songs have touched audiences all over the world.
Ponta de Areia (Milton Nascimento) 5:15
Tarde (Fernando Brant / Milton Nascimento) 5:48
Ana Maria (Wayne Shorter) 5:05
from Native Dancer 1974
Some jazz purists would say that Wayne Shorter went downhill in the 1970s, when he passionately embraced electric jazz-fusion and co-led the innovative Weather Report with Joe Zawinul. But remember: Those are the same people who also claim that Miles Davis' stunning Bitches Brew has no value, and that Chick Corea's visionary Return to Forever was a complete waste -- so it's hard to take their opinions seriously. The fact is that the '70s were a highly productive time for Shorter, and it wasn't until the '80s that the tenor and soprano saxophonist really declined creatively. One of Shorter's best-selling albums from the '70s was Native Dancer, a Brazilian-oriented jazz-fusion masterpiece that boasts Herbie Hancock on acoustic piano and electric keyboards, and employs such Brazilian talent as singer Milton Nascimento (a superstar in Brazil) and percussionist Airto Moreira...



Fired some of the first shots in the fusion revolution, and, for the majority of the 15 years of its existence, was its premier exponent.
Weather Report
Man in the Green Shirt (Joe Zawinul) 6:28
Between the Thighs (Joe Zawinul) 9:28
Freezing Fire (Wayne Shorter) 7:27
from Tale Spinnin' 1975
Weather Report's ever-changing lineup shifts again, with the somewhat heavier funk-oriented Leon "Ndugu" Chancler dropping into the drummer's chair and Alyrio Lima taking over the percussion table. As a result, Tale Spinnin' has a weightier feel than Mysterious Traveller, while continuing the latter's explorations in Latin-spiced electric jazz/funk. Zawinul's pioneering interest in what we now call world music is more in evidence with the African percussion, wordless vocals, and sandy sound effects of "Badia," and his synthesizer sophistication is growing along with the available technology. Wayne Shorter's work on soprano sax is more animated than on the previous two albums and Alphonso Johnson puts his melodic bass more to the fore. While not quite as inventive as its two predecessors, this remains an absorbing extension of WR's mid-'70s direction.



One of the most remarkable guitarists in contemporary jazz, he played with countless major artists.  / Of the electric guitar's few proponents in avant-garde jazz, Sonny Sharrock is easily the most influential; he was one of the earliest guitarists to even attempt free playing, along with Derek Bailey and Sonny Greenwich. Sharrock's visceral aggression and monolithic sheets of noise were influenced by the screaming overtones of saxophonists like Coltrane, Sanders, and Ayler, and his experiments with distortion and feedback predated even Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, he provoked much hostility among traditionalists, but once his innovations were assimilated, he enjoyed wide renown in avant-garde circles.
Sonny & Linda Sharrock
While not as well known or extensively recorded as other vocal improvisers like Jeanne Lee, Irene Abei, or even Urzula Dudziak, Linda Sharrock's soaring, swelling sound is just as penetrating and striking...
Apollo (Dave Artis / Linda Sharrock / Sonny Sharrock) 7:50
Miss Doris (Sonny Sharrock) 9:22
1953 Blue Boogie Children (Sonny Sharrock) 7:04
from Paradise 1975









One of the key fusion groups of the '70s, helmed by Chick Corea and featuring an impressive list of leading jazz musicians. / Jazz keyboard player Chick Corea's Return to Forever emerged as one of the key jazz-rock fusion bands of the 1970s. Like Weather Report and the Mahavishnu Orchestra, they were formed by an alumnus of Miles Davis' late-'60s bands with the intention of furthering the jazz-rock hybrid Davis had explored on albums like Bitches Brew. At the time, this was seen as a means of creativity, a new direction for jazz, and as a way of attracting the kinds of large audiences enjoyed by rock musicians. Return to Forever started out as more of a Latin-tinged jazz ensemble, but Corea, influenced by the Mahavishnu Orchestra of John McLaughlin and some of the progressive rock bands coming out of Great Britain, notably Yes and Emerson, Lake & Palmer, moved the group more toward rock, achieving considerable commercial success. A later re-orientation of the band gave it more of a big-band style before Corea folded the unit, retaining the Return to Forever name for occasional tours and other projects...
Return to Forever
Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy (Chick Corea) 3:30
Captain Señor Mouse (Chick Corea) 9:02
Theme to the Mothership (Chick Corea) 8:48
from The Anthology / Recording Date August, 1973 - February, 1976 (2008)
Prospective buyers should know from the jump that Concord's two-disc Return to Forever retrospective is not complete. It only concerns itself with the era between 1973-1976, when Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, and Lenny White added an electric guitarist to the mix. Of the four recordings represented here -- Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy (1973); Where Have I Known You Before (1974); No Mystery (1975),and "Romantic Warrior" (1976) -- only the first and last are presented in their entirety. They are considered critically as the beginning and ends of the "classic" RTF sound. The middle two albums were reissued in a single package from BGO. Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy is a (maybe the) quintessential jazz-rock fusion album; in many ways it sounds less dated than any RTF record that followed it...



Led by guitarist John McLaughlin, a band whose sophisticated improvisations and high-powered music helped pioneer the jazz-rock fusion of the '70s.
Mahavishnu Orchestra
All in the Family (John McLaughlin) 6:01
In My Life (John McLaughlin / Narada Michael Walden) 3:21
Gita (John McLaughlin) 4:27
from Inner Worlds 1976
The state of the second Mahavishnu Orchestra continued to be volatile in 1975, with violinist Jean-Luc Ponty out, keyboardist Gayle Moran replaced by Stu Goldberg, and all string and horn backings removed, leaving just a steaming quartet and this lone remarkable album. The addition of Goldberg, a more interesting musician than Moran, is significant, but the biggest charge is provided by the leader who, in tandem with the latest electronic equipment, turns in some of his most passionately alive playing of the whole Mahavishnu series...



Hard-blowing tenor who greatly expanded his stylistic menu by exploring Asian and Middle Eastern rhythms, instruments, and concepts.  / Yusef Lateef long had an inquisitive spirit and he was never just a bop or hard bop soloist. Lateef, who did not care much for the term "jazz," consistently created music that stretched (and even broke through) boundaries. A superior tenor saxophonist with a soulful sound and impressive technique, by the 1950s Lateef was one of the top flutists around. He also developed into the best jazz soloist to date on oboe, was an occasional bassoonist, and introduced such instruments as the argol (a double clarinet that resembles a bassoon), shanai (a type of oboe), and different types of flutes. Lateef played "world music" before it had a name and his output was much more creative than much of the pop and folk music that passed under that label in the '90s...
Yusef Lateef 
The Improvisers (Yusef Lateef) 7:55
Mystique (Kenny Barron) 7:42
Mushmouth (Kenny Barron) 6:28
from The Doctor Is In ...and Out 1976
In 1976, Yusef Lateef's as restless a spiritual seeker as there ever was in the field of music, revisited some of his earliest themes in the context of modern sonic frameworks: The Eastern modal and melodic frameworks of his Prestige sides, such as Eastern Sounds, Cry!/Tender, and Other Sounds, brought to bear in much more sophisticated, complex, and grooved-out ways -- after all, it had been 20 years or more. The groove referred to is funk and soul. Funk itself was mutating at the time, so Lateef's interpolation at the crossroads of all ports in the musical journey was not only valid in 1976, but also necessary. For this recording, he utilized an absolutely huge group of musicians, bringing them in for this or that part, or a sound, or a particular vamp. Some of those present were Kenny Barron, Ron Carter, Dom Um Romao, Al Foster, Billy Butler, Anthony Jackson, a five-piece brass section, and a synth player. Lateef, as always, was offering evocative glimpses of geographical, psychological, spiritual, and emotional terrain in his compositions, but not in predictable ways...



The epitome of cool, an eternally evolving trumpeter who repeatedly changed the course of jazz between the 1950s and '90s. / Throughout a professional career lasting 50 years, Miles Davis played the trumpet in a lyrical, introspective, and melodic style, often employing a stemless Harmon mute to make his sound more personal and intimate. But if his approach to his instrument was constant, his approach to jazz was dazzlingly protean. To examine his career is to examine the history of jazz from the mid-'40s to the early '90s, since he was in the thick of almost every important innovation and stylistic development in the music during that period, and he often led the way in those changes, both with his own performances and recordings and by choosing sidemen and collaborators who forged new directions. It can even be argued that jazz stopped evolving when Davis wasn't there to push it forward.
Miles Davis
Water Babies (Wayne Shorter) 5:06
Sweet Pea (Wayne Shorter) 7:59
Splash (Miles Davis) 10:05
from Water Babies 1977
This studio LP was first released almost a decade after it was recorded. The first half features the 1967 Quintet (with Wayne Shorter on tenor and soprano, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams) performing three otherwise unknown Shorter compositions. The flip side finds Davis in 1968 leading the same group (with possibly Chick Corea and Dave Holland replacing Hancock and Carter) on two early fusion jams that look a bit toward Bitches Brew. Although not an essential set, this album fills in some gaps during Davis's transitional period from adventurous acoustic playing to early electric performances.



Fired some of the first shots in the fusion revolution, and, for the majority of the 15 years of its existence, was its premier exponent. / Weather Report started out as a jazz equivalent of what the rock world in 1970 was calling a "supergroup." But unlike most of the rock supergroups, this one not only kept going for a good 15 years, it more than lived up to its billing, practically defining the state of the jazz-rock art throughout almost all of its run. Weather Report also anticipated and contributed to the North American interest in world music rhythms and structures, prodded by keyboardist/co-founder Joe Zawinul. And WR, like many of jazz's great long-lived groups, proved to be an incubator for several future leaders who passed in and out of the band in a never-ending series of revolving-door personnel changes. The original members of the band were Zawinul, Wayne Shorter (saxophones), Miroslav Vitous (electric bass), Airto Moreira (percussion) and Alphonse Mouzon (drums), with only Zawinul and (until 1985) Shorter remaining in place throughout the band's lifespan. Zawinul, Shorter and Moreira all had experience playing in and influencing the studio and live electric bands of Miles Davis -- and at first, WR was a direct extension of Miles' In a Silent Way/Bitches Brew period, with free-floating collective improvisation and interplay, combining elements of jazz, rock, funk, Latin and other ethnic musics...
Birdland (Joe Zawinul) 5:59
Teen Town (Jaco Pastorius) 2:52
The Juggler (Joe Zawinul) 5:03
from Heavy Weather 1977
Weather Report's biggest-selling album is that ideal thing, a popular and artistic success -- and for the same reasons. For one thing, Joe Zawinul revealed an unexpectedly potent commercial streak for the first time since his Cannonball Adderley days, contributing what has become a perennial hit, "Birdland." Indeed, "Birdland" is a remarkable bit of record-making, a unified, ever-developing piece of music that evokes, without in any way imitating, a joyous evening on 52nd St. with a big band. The other factor is the full emergence of Jaco Pastorius as a co-leader; his dancing, staccato bass lifting itself out of the bass range as a third melodic voice, completely dominating his own ingenious "Teen Town" (where he also plays drums!). By now, Zawinul has become WR's de facto commander in the studio; his colorful synthesizers dictate the textures, his conceptions are carefully planned, with little of the freewheeling improvisation of only five years before. Wayne Shorter's saxophones are now reticent, if always eloquent, beams of light in Zawinul's general scheme while Alex Acuña shifts ably over to the drums and Manolo Badrena handles the percussion. Released just as the jazz-rock movement began to run out of steam, this landmark album proved that there was plenty of creative life left in the idiom.


The first jazz violinist to incorporate electronic devices and effects into his playing. / It has been a long, fascinating odyssey for Jean-Luc Ponty, who started out as a straight jazz violinist only to become a pioneer of the electric violin in jazz-rock in the '70s and an inspired manipulator of sequencers and synthesizers in the '80s. At first merely amplifying his violin in order to be heard, he switched over to electric violin and augmented it with devices that were associated with electric guitarists and keyboardists, like Echoplex machines, distortion boxes, phase shifters, and wah-wah pedals. Classically trained, with an unquenchable ability to swing when he wants to, and consumed by a passion for tight structures and repeating ostinatos, Ponty has been able to handle styles as diverse as swing, bop, free and modal jazz, jazz-rock, world music, and even country, mixing them up at will...
Cosmic Messenger (Jean-Luc Ponty) 4:42
The Art of Happiness (Jean-Luc Ponty) 4:29
Puppets' Dance (Jean-Luc Ponty) 3:39
from Cosmic Messenger 1978
Cosmic Messenger is more elegant, European-flavored jazz-rock from the French virtuoso Jean-Luc Ponty, and pretty much in the same mold as his previous Atlantic albums but with gradually tightening control over every parameter of performance. Ponty's analog-delay special effects on the title track are spectacular, and the album is loaded more than ever with revolving electronic arpeggios as Ponty's own involvement with the ARP synthesizer grows. But there is still plenty of his fluid, slippery electric violin soloing to be heard within the tight structures of these pieces, and the tunes themselves are often pretty good. In addition, this fusion express finds its way into the funk on "The Art of Happiness," and there are some tricky rhythmic experiments on some tunes.


Pioneering fusion guitarist who explored everything from psychedelic rock to unaccompanied acoustic music to straight-ahead bebop. / As one of the pioneers of jazz-rock -- perhaps the pioneer in the ears of some -- Larry Coryell deserves a special place in the history books. He brought what amounted to a nearly alien sensibility to jazz electric guitar playing in the 1960s, a hard-edged, cutting tone, and phrasing and note-bending that owed as much to blues, rock, and even country as it did to earlier, smoother bop influences.
w/ John Scofield and Joe Beck 
The File (Larry Coryell) 4:49
Little B's Poem (Bobby Hutcherson) 4:25
Equinox (John Coltrane) 5:05
from Tributaries 1979
This CD reissue brings back material that guitarist Larry Coryell recorded for the Novus subsidiary when it was run by Arista. Most of the set matches Coryell with fellow guitarists John Scofield and Joe Beck in acoustic trios, two duets and one overdubbed solo performance. The variation of moods and the jazz-oriented material make this summit meeting a success even if the guitarists tend to sound more distinctive on their electric counterparts; after about 20 minutes of similar sounding acoustic guitars, it is difficult not to doze off...




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