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2017. szeptember 2., szombat

02-09-2017 11:36 # 50 blues songs from the BLUES circle 1990-1997 3h 45m


02-09-2017 11:36 # 50 blues songs from the BLUES circle 1990-1997 3h 45m # Charlie Musselwhite, Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters, Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Sue Foley, Eric Clapton, BB King, Paul Geremia, Luther Allison, Jimmy Rogers, Ry Cooder, Charlie Musselwhite, Taj Mahal, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Freddie King, Kenny Brown

M U S I C




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from 1990-1997


A Mississippi transplant whose rangy, subtle harp playing made a splash in Chicago blues circles beginning in the 1960s. / Harmonica wizard Norton Buffalo can recollect a leaner time when his record collection had been whittled down to only the bare essentials: The Paul Butterfield Blues Band and Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite's South Side Band. Butterfield and Musselwhite will probably be forever linked as the two most interesting, and arguably the most important, products of the "white blues movement" of the mid- to late '60s -- not only because they were near the forefront chronologically, but because they both stand out as being especially faithful to the style.
Charlie Musselwhite
The Blues Overtook Me (Charlie Musselwhite) 4:41
She May Be Your Woman (Charlie Musselwhite) 8:40
River Hip Mama (Andrew "Jr. Boy" Jones / Charlie Musselwhite) 4:16
from Ace Of Harps 1990
"This is the best band I've ever had," Musselwhite proclaims on the back of this LP; longtime fans would find that debatable. Rather than schooled on the Chess sounds that provided Charlie with his foundation, these guys play a Malaco strain of blues, and Tommy Hill is simply one of the busiest (read: obnoxious) drummers anywhere...

Long-standing blues guitarist, successful both as a solo artist and as a member of Roomful of Blues. / One of the finest blues guitarists to emerge during the '80s, Ronnie Earl often straddled the line between blues and jazz, throwing in touches of soul and rock as well. His versatility made him one of the few blues guitarists capable of leading an almost entirely instrumental outfit, and his backing band the Broadcasters became one of the more respected working units in contemporary blues over the course of the '90s, following Earl's departure from Roomful of Blues.
Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters
I Want to Shout About It (Ronnie Earl / Steve Gomes) 3:32
Peace of Mind (Ronnie Earl / Steve Gomes) 5:24
T-Bone Boogie (T-Bone Walker) 3:50
Stickin' (Ronnie Earl / Per Hanson) 3:44
from Peace Of Mind 1990
A latecomer to the riches of the blues guitar, Earl started playing when he was 22, after going to a Muddy Waters gig in Boston. At the time, Earl was working as a special education teacher. In the 15 years since, this most soulful of musicians has kept company with some of the top names in deep blues, jump blues and big city blues, recording and playing with the likes of B.B. King, the late Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson, Hubert Sumlin and Lou Rawls.
Peace of Mind is Earl’s fourth solo release since leaving his lead guitar spot with the horn-heavy Roomful of Blues. The album features eight new numbers co-written by Earl, the best of which are the sophisticated, T-Bone Walkerish instrumental “Stickin’,” which also shows off the handsome tenor saxophone stylings of Greg Piccolo...

A guitarist and singer/songwriter who took an interest in reviving the rural blues tradition, later extending to reggae and ragtime influences.  / One of the most prominent figures in late 20th century blues, singer/multi-instrumentalist Taj Mahal played an enormous role in revitalizing and preserving traditional acoustic blues. Not content to stay within that realm, Mahal soon broadened his approach, taking a musicologist's interest in a multitude of folk and roots music from around the world -- reggae and other Caribbean folk, jazz, gospel, R&B, zydeco, various West African styles, Latin, even Hawaiian.
Taj Mahal
Don't Call Us (Richard Feldman / Taj Mahal) 4:20
Blues With a Feeling (Little Walter) 3:53
Cakewalk into Town (Taj Mahal) 3:00
from Like Never Before 1991
After a string of children's albums and other side projects, Taj Mahal returns to his roots with Like Never Before -- an eclectic assortment of styles featuring traditional covers and a new batch of originals.



Blues-rock slide guitarist with a bewitching, heartfelt voice who built a cult following in the '70s, then exploded to pop stardom in the '80s. 
Bonnie Raitt
Something to Talk About (Shirley Eikhard) 3:47
Slow Ride (Bonnie Hayes / Larry John McNally) 3:59
Luck of the Draw (Phil Brady) 5:17
from Luck of the Draw 1991
Nick of Time not only was an artistic comeback for Bonnie Raitt; it brought her largest audience yet, so there was no reason to mess with success for its sequel, Luck of the Draw. And sequel is the appropriate word, since Luck of the Draw is nothing if it isn't Nick of Time, Pt. 2. True, there's a heavier reliance on original material this time around, but the sound and feel of the record is identical to its predecessor...


When she was a child in Ottawa, Foley listened to rock & roll and blues-rock groups like the Rolling Stones. Although these bands sowed the seeds of her affection for the blues, her love for the music didn't blossom until she witnessed James Cotton in concert when she was 15 years old. Cotton inspired Foley to pick up the electric guitar. During her late teens and early twenties, she jammed with local Ottawa bar bands
Sue Foley
Queen Bee (James Moore) 4:11
Gone Blind (Sue Foley) 3:46
Little Mixed Up 2:27
Hooked on Love (Earl Hooker) 2:50
from Young Girl Blues 1992
Sue Foley's debut album, Young Girl Blues, is an impressive effort. Not only is Foley a wild, adventurous guitarist, she can write songs that don't merely rehash standard blue clichés. Her songs have an intense passion that is heightened by her array of gutsy guitar textures, which are rooted in blues tradition but never tied down to it.

A rock guitar legend who, in addition to a distinguished solo career, collaborated with countless artists and played in many classic bands. / By the time Eric Clapton launched his solo career with the release of his self-titled debut album in mid-1970, he was long established as one of the world's major rock stars due to his group affiliations -- the Yardbirds, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Cream, and Blind Faith -- which had demonstrated his claim to being the best rock guitarist of his generation.
Realization (Eric Clapton) 2:41
Don't Know Which Way to Go (Willie Dixon / Al Perkins) 10:48
from Rush 1992
Rush is an excellent dark blues score written by Eric Clapton (with help on the three songs) and performed by an augmented version of his band...  Buddy Guy turns up to add lead vocals and guitar on the 11-minute version of Willie Dixon's "Don't Know Which Way to Go," and that's more than all right too... At its best, Clapton's music can speak of the pain he feels -- and Clapton has rarely been better than he is here.

Highly influential guitarist with a precise yet effortless sounding soft-fingered style, as well as the longest career in blues. 
Playin' with My Friends feat: Robert Cray  (Robert Cray / Dennis Walker) 5:18
I Pity the Fool feat: Buddy Guy (Deadric Malone) 4:36
You're the Boss feat: Ruth Brown (Jerry Leiber / Mike Stoller) 4:05
from Blues Summit 1993
On this release, King comes close to equaling his past triumphs on small independent labels in the '50s and '60s. He's ditched the psuedo-hip production fodder and cut a 12-song set matching him with blues peers. His duets with Buddy Guy, John Lee Hooker, and Albert Collins are especially worthy, while the songs with Koko Taylor, Ruth Brown, and Irma Thomas have some good-natured banter and exchanges, as well as tasty vocals. The master gives willing pupils Joe Louis Walker and Robert Cray valuable lessons on their collaborations. There's also a medley in which King invokes the spirit of his chitlin circuit days, taking the vocal spotlight while his Orchestra roars along underneath.

Paul Geremia is a bluesy acoustic guitarist with a new age sound, and one of the best white acoustic bluesmen around. / Since the mid-'60s when he made the move to go full-time with his artistry, Rhode Island-based acoustic blues and folksinger Paul Geremia has supported himself through his music. Geremia is an Italian-American from Providence, Rhode Island, a town that gave birth to the careers of Roomful of Blues, Duke Robillard, and other iconic blues figures.
Gamblin' Woman Blues (Paul Geremia) 4:53
Skin Game Blues (Peg Leg Howell) 4:41
She Moves It Just Right (Barbecue Bob) 2:17
Good Liquor Gonna Carry Me Down (Keep on Drinkin') (Big Bill Broonzy) 4:22
The most recent album by Geremia is an acoustic blues jewel, with superb renditions of songs...  Del Long and Rory McLeod back up his six- and 12-string work on piano and upright bass, respectively, in this spare, authentic-sounding acoustic folk-blues outing. Eric Von Schmidt provided the cover art.



Distinctive Chicago blues guitar stylist who expatriated to France in the '70s and returned to great acclaim in the '90s. / An American-born guitarist, singer, and songwriter who lived in France since 1980, Luther Allison was the man to book at blues festivals in the mid-'90s. Allison's comeback into the mainstream was ushered in by a recording contract with an American record company, Chicago-based Alligator Records. After he signed with Alligator in 1994, Allison's popularity grew exponentially and he worked steadily until his death in 1997.
Luther Allison
Bad Love 6:23
Nobody But You 4:33
Freedom 5:45
from Bad Love 1994

Brilliant urban blues guitarist and recording artist who worked extensively with Muddy Waters. / Guitarist Jimmy Rogers was the last living connection to the groundbreaking first Chicago band of Muddy Waters (informally dubbed "the Headhunters" for their penchant of dropping by other musicians' gigs and "cutting their heads" with a superior on-stage performance). Instead of basking in world-wide veneration, he was merely a well-respected Chicago elder boasting a seminal '50s Chess Records catalog, both behind Waters and on his own.
Jimmy Rogers
I'm Tired of Crying over You 3:46
Blue Bird (Jimmy D. Lane) 4:47
Whay Are You So Mean to Me (5:28)
from Blue Bird 1994
This was Jimmy Rogers' last "proper" Chicago blues album, and it deservedly won a W.C. Handy Award in 1995. There are no moonlighting rock stars here; they would come out in droves for Rogers' subsequent album Blues Blues Blues. And with the exception of the last track -- which is basically pianist Johnnie Johnson showing off for eight minutes -- Rogers sits squarely in the spotlight for the duration of Blue Bird... The backing band is a mix of Chicago blues brethren (Carey Bell on harp, Dave Myers on bass, Ted Harvey on drums) and family (Rogers' son Jimmy D. Lane on lead guitar), plus Johnson, who is perhaps a rock star by association since he played with Chuck Berry for 18 years. This one's a must-have.

Virtuoso roots guitarist who was steeped in the blues, but spent his career exploring new musical worlds from Tex-Mex to Cuban bolero. / Whether serving as a session musician, solo artist, or soundtrack composer, Ry Cooder's chameleon-like fretted instrument virtuosity, songwriting, and choices of material encompass an incredibly eclectic range of North American musical styles, including rock & roll, blues, reggae, Tex-Mex, Hawaiian, Dixieland jazz, country, folk, R&B, gospel, and vaudeville.
Ry Cooder
Paris, Texas 2:52
Theme from Alamo Bay 5:09
Highway 23 1:56
from Music By Ry Cooder 1995
Since he's a limited vocalist with erratic songwriting skills, one could justifiably argue that the soundtrack medium is the best vehicle for Ry Cooder's talents, allowing him to construct eclectic, chiefly instrumental pieces drawing upon all sorts of roots music and ethnic flavors (often, but not always, employing his excellent blues and slide guitar)... As few listeners (even Cooder fans) are dedicated enough to go to the trouble of finding all of his individual soundtracks, this is a good distillation of many of his more notable contributions in this idiom, although it inevitably leaves out some fine moments. Still, it's well programmed and evocative, often conjuring visions of ghostly landscapes and funky border towns.

A Mississippi transplant whose rangy, subtle harp playing made a splash in Chicago blues circles beginning in the 1960s. / Harmonica wizard Norton Buffalo can recollect a leaner time when his record collection had been whittled down to only the bare essentials: The Paul Butterfield Blues Band and Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite's South Side Band. Butterfield and Musselwhite will probably be forever linked as the two most interesting, and arguably the most important, products of the "white blues movement" of the mid- to late '60s -- not only because they were near the forefront chronologically, but because they both stand out as being especially faithful to the style.
Charlie Musselwhite
Louisiana Fog (Charlie Musselwhite) 4:15
Big Leg Woman (With a Short Short Mini Skirt) (Israel Tolbert) 4:49
Fell On My Knees (Charlie Musselwhite) 5:40
from Takin' Care Of Business 1995

A guitarist and singer/songwriter who took an interest in reviving the rural blues tradition, later extending to reggae and ragtime influences. / One of the most prominent figures in late 20th century blues, singer/multi-instrumentalist Taj Mahal played an enormous role in revitalizing and preserving traditional acoustic blues. Not content to stay within that realm, Mahal soon broadened his approach, taking a musicologist's interest in a multitude of folk and roots music from around the world -- reggae and other Caribbean folk, jazz, gospel, R&B, zydeco, various West African styles, Latin, even Hawaiian.
Taj Mahal
Lovin' in My Baby's Eyes (Taj Mahal) 2:43
Fanning the Flames (Jon Cleary) 4:50
(You've Got to) Love Her With a Feeling (Freddie King / Sonny Thompson) 3:48
from Phantom Blues 1996
An eclectic bluesman would seem to be a contradiction in terms, but Taj Mahal, who has moved through the worlds of folk, rock, and pop to reach his present categorization, fits the description, and here he takes several pop and R&B oldies that came from blues roots ... and returns them to those roots. He also calls in such guest stars as Eric Clapton and Bonnie Raitt, who have more than a nodding acquaintance with the blues, to assist him. The result is progressive blues hybrid that treats the music not as a source, but as a destination.

Guitarist, singer, and songwriter Alvin Youngblood Hart is continuing in the path laid down by acoustic blues practitioners like Taj Mahal, Guy Davis, and other '90s blues revivalists, but his roots go back much further than that, to the classic stylings of Bukka White, Charley Patton, Leadbelly, and Blind Willie McTell.
Big Mama's Door (Alvin Youngblood Hart) 3:51
Gallows Pole (Jimmy Page / Robert Plant / Traditional) 4:45
If Blues Was Money (Alvin Youngblood Hart) 3:38
from Big Mama'S Door 1996
The debut recording of 33-year-old Hart is extraordinarily simple and simply extraordinary. Except for three cuts on which he's joined by Taj Mahal, Big Mama's Door is just Hart on acoustic guitar and vocals, and he's not doing anything fancy -- just playing prewar-style blues, mostly in a percussive Delta manner, recorded live to two-track. Yet he succeeds so well in blending technique and feeling, structure and spontaneity, tradition and freshness that he produces a minor gem of a blues record, evocative of the blues masters of the 1920s and '30s. He covers Leadbelly, Blind Willie McTell, Charley Patton, and the Mississippi Sheiks and does originals that replicate older blues idioms, not just in the notes but in the nuances, and in the personal commitment he brings to the material.

Blues singer and guitarist who flourished in the 1960s with a laid-back voice and a facile, fast-fingered guitar technique. / Guitarist Freddie King rode to fame in the early '60s with a spate of catchy instrumentals which became instant bandstand fodder for fellow bluesmen and white rock bands alike. Employing a more down-home (thumb and finger picks) approach to the B.B. King single-string style of playing, King enjoyed success on a variety of different record labels. Furthermore, he was one of the first bluesmen to employ a racially integrated group on-stage behind him. Influenced by Eddie Taylor, Jimmy Rogers, and Robert Jr. Lockwood, King went on to influence the likes of Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Lonnie Mack, among many others.
Sweet Home Chicago (Robert Johnson) 4:24
Gambling Woman Blues (Freddie King) 8:39
TV Mama 3:58

Raised in northern Mississippi’s hill country, as a child Brown absorbed the region’s rich musical
heritage. Largely self-taught on guitar, his guitar-playing neighbour, the under-recorded bluesman Joe Callicott, gave him encouragement and coaching. At the start of the 70s, Brown, who still had a day job in the construction industry, met R.L. Burnside and suggested they team up. Thereafter, he played with Burnside whenever possible, also working with George ‘Mojo’ Buford, Mississippi Fred McDowell and Johnny Woods before his partnership with Burnside filled his working life. At one point, he and Burnside played with Jon Spencer’s punk blues band. By the early 90s, Burnside and Brown were a formidable team, touring the USA, playing everything from juke joints to small festivals.
From Now On (Kenny Brown) 6:09
Goin' Back To Mississippi (Kenny Brown) 2:55
Jumper On the Line (Traditional) 5:06




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